Musical instruments donations to schools

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This is the bare minimum they seem to ask for, though we were ultimately asked to go back three or four. Basically, what they’re looking for is some sort of average that you make per year, which their number crunchers will put in a formula to figure out how much you can afford.

That’s pleasurable to use because of something cognitive scientists call the “fluency heuristic,” a psychological shortcut our brains use that’s associated with pleasure. In other words, the human brain likes things it can process faster. And with good reason! With so much going on every second, your brain has to focus on the things it can process quickly just to keep up.

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This test that you can perform at home is important for two reasons. Firstly, it demonstrates how, when we talk about phase, we’re describing the relative relationship between the peaks and troughs of different waveforms and how they affect the cumulative volume. Secondly, the phase flip demonstrated above is one of the most common ways an (aspiring) audio engineer will relate to phase. Because simply inverting the phase of a signal can make so much of a difference to how it interacts with other signals, this functionality is built into a lot of audio equipment and is a cornerstone of good recording and mixing practice.

Take a look back at television shows that were geared towards young children throughout the decades and listen to their themes. I’m a ’90s kid myself, so I watched a lot of shows on PBS Kids, especially Arthur, and I watched a lot of Disney movies like The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, and Hercules. When songs and musical pieces mimic scale degrees from these shows and movies and focus on notes 1, 2, 3, and 5 in a scale, they bring me back to my childhood just a bit.

When I first discovered there was such a thing as “Music For Dogs,” I was kind of shocked I hadn’t come across it sooner. I mean, there is now music and playlists to accompany everything, so of course there’d be one for our favorite four-legged fur-balls (sorry cat lovers). Well, Mr. Puppy was in for a treat because over the next week I’d go on to try an array of made-for-dogs style playlists.

Here we see that we’ve flattened out into a bit more of a bell curve rather than that middle-finger looking thing from 2017, with the four-chord song still being the norm. Panic! at the Disco threw some jazzy borrowed and secondary chords our way and pushed the collective envelope one column further than 2017, with an all-out eight-chorder.

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The gottlieb foundation individual support grant

Their now-classic debut, Music Has the Right to Children, contrasted starkly with the clinical, busy, and hyped sounds of 1990s techno. In retrospect, whole genres such as chillwave and lo-fi rap would sound vastly different without having been able to walk the trails laid down by Music Has the Right to Children and Boards of Canada’s other releases.

A short essay on why we should’ve never eaten the apple of industry-approved digital music streaming, and why the low-bitrate MP3 is all we really need.

It seems we can always turn to a popular old melody for some familiar sing-along action. The lyrics of this tune have a bit of an icky past, harking back to the American Civil War, but like most public domain songs to stand the test of time, the simplistic melody often reminds us of childhood. In “Shoo Fly, Don’t Bother Me” you’ll find the major third at 0:04, on the lyrics “Shoo” and “fly.”

The Scottish duo of Michael Sandison and Marcus Eoin known as Boards of Canada is one of the most influential production teams in electronic music history. The sounds they conjure from their synthesizers and samplers are nothing if not evocative: of half-remembered childhoods, warbly analog recording mediums, reality-bending psychedelic experiences, and so on.

Some ideas come in like a flash and then disappear so fast that I don’t have a chance to engage with them; and other ideas stick around through thick and thin. The latter are the ones that tend to make it onto records. I’d been kicking around “In the 1970s” for about five years before I finally decided to bring it in to the band. Also I am very, very critical of myself (hooray!); not just with music, but with all things. It helps, most of the time!