National endowment for the arts

The queen of jazz has a beautiful point here and it’s such a great reminder that “love is the thing.” Isn’t that why we play music? We freakin’ love it and it makes us feel alive. We play to empty clubs, bare our souls, and write about our broken hearts for the love of it. And isn’t it amazing that you’ve found something you love? There are a lot of people out there who have no idea what their passion is — who may work dead-end jobs or feel lost. I used to be one. But when I found music, it was like finding God. I’m not religious, but I can see how people get into it. It feels amazing to have something you love, something nobody can take away from you. And to me, that’s the key to a happy and successful life.

Mixing therefore does not necessarily include worrying about the final volume level, dynamic range, stereo image width, or any concerns about how it might sound on the many different playback systems listeners may be using. Those will all be taken care of in mastering, when we look at the song as a whole and how it will be presented to the world. Mastering is the set of processes aimed at the final combined stereo output after all the mixing work is finalized.

As producers, we need to be open to letting collaborators steer the ship for us every now and then. Without giving our music that freedom, we run the very real risk of sounding stale. Any track I’ve made that I am truly proud of has featured someone doing something I can’t do myself and in a way that makes rethink the composition process entirely. We should strive to surround ourselves with those whose skills and visions are different from our own. And it’s up to us to adapt their contributions in order to suit our overall vision and take our music to new heights.

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For example, we played a show in Vancouver and made friends with the other artist on the bill. She told us about an “Italian Day” street fair happening the next day, and guess what — we were there! Friends help you get through the monotony of long tours.

Modes and Key Signatures have a variety of different characteristics and are great for outside-the-box songwriting. Here’s a cheat sheet to remember them!

We all know that vinyl manufacturing these days is plagued by delays; it strikes me that if the artist or label needs to wait until a certain number of pre-orders is reached to start manufacturing, that’s just making an already lengthy process even longer.

Another common issue is sibilance — or excessive “s,” “t,” and “z” sounds — often exacerbated by cheap condenser microphones. Sometimes this issue can be solved using an equalizer to remove the offensive frequencies in the 5-10 kHz range, but this approach often leaves the vocal sounding dull and flat. A much more effective solution is to use a de-esser to attenuate the specific frequencies causing the sibilance. This way, the frequency is only attenuated when it becomes excessive, leaving the vocal sounding bright and clear the rest of the time.

The smooth groovy vibes of Yacht Rock await. Learn how songs by Steely Dan, Toto, and the Doobie Brothers function to use their ideas in your own songs!

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When it comes to visuals, nothing is unimportant, and everything helps. Don’t be afraid to try a bunch of different things until you find something that fits.

It’s like having a “personal trainer for your music,” with a series of musical workouts, a whole lot of feedback and support, and the chance to accomplish something you’ll be proud of. Explore Headliners Club today and click here to tell us more about your musical goals. We’d love to help you reach them! 

Patrick McGuire is a writer, musician and human man. He lives nowhere in particular, creates music under the name Straight White Teeth, and has a great affinity for dogs and putting his hands in his pockets.

The riff itself starts out on the root, jumps up to the octave and walks down a full step, and then a half step before dropping back down to the root and beginning a walk back up. Layer that with some aggressive cello triplets, and a soaring electro-theremin riff, and you’ve got the backbone of what Brian Wilson called a “pocket symphony.”

NSYNC’s “Bye Bye Bye” is pure pop in all its youthful glory — this song brings me right back to my first celebrity crush, Lance Bass (yes, the gay one, just my luck). As soon as I hear this song, I laugh to myself and immediately do the dance from their music video.